Archive for set design

Movie Real Estate: Grey Gardens

Posted in Movie Houses with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 9, 2010 by Christine Haskell

I know I’m a bit late posting on this one, but it’s worth noting the set. I would recommend seeing the documentary and movie back to back, as they were both spectacular on their own, but inform one another.I collected some photos from Grey Garden News and Old Hollywood Glamour.

Grey Gardens starred Drew Barrymore as “Little” Edith Bouvier Beale and Jessica Lange as “Big” Edith Bouvier Beale and each gave a very moving and sensitive performance. It’s just had it’s first high school performance, that would have been interesting along side playbills for Hello Dolly!

I was left with strong feelings of what mental illness really means (clearly there was an alternate reality present when cats are peeing behind large artwork) however I also felt these women had really found an independance for themselves and truly cared for one another.

Costume designer Cat Thomas covered the 1920’s through the 1970’s fashion brilliantly. Dressing characters that were based on true eccentrics-come-fashion-icons without turning them in to caricatures is no easy task.

An interview from Glamour.com sums it up best:

STF: Little Edie is one of those characters that has been so deeply mined for inspiration over the years–fashion just seems to love her. What do you think is her enduring appeal? And how did you manage to bring your own new twist to something that we’ve already seen so many iterations of?
CT: I think the thing that’s interesting about her, and one of the reasons people are so drawn to her, is this evolution of a young woman 17, 18 years old, you get to see both of them [Big Edie and Little Edie] at the prime of their lives with all of this glamour and ease and in the context of the Hamptons. It was sort of a careless, carefree, youthful and also very innocent moment. And then you get to see that departure point, which is important. She was beautiful, she was modeling, it was the pinnacle of her life, and then you get the deterioration which she still manages to make fashionable.

Edie Beale, Style icon, in her "costume for the day"

Visit Grey Gardens News for all things Grey Gardens!

Resting Decay

Eery to see pianos in such run down condition and seeing the singing in the movie makes this photo even more silent.

The main artery in any home...the stairwell.

Beautiful glass details

Set Design Print of living room

Set Design Print: Living Room

Grey Gardens, in the manner it is accustomed.

Entryway

Living Room

Living room, this portrait later kept Big Edie company by her beside, and was a frequent area for the cats to relieve themselves.

Staged aging...

The start of seclusion...I love the asian inspired wall paper and classic 1950s bedding, everything in that time period had a "frosted paint" job. A pity, because it was generally over very valuable hard wood.

Independant to the end...

To learn how you can get your own Edie Doll, complete with Wonderbread bag for the attic raccoons, click here.

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Christine

Movie Real Estate: The Holiday

Posted in Movie Houses with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 19, 2009 by Christine Haskell

Once again, Production designer Jon Hutman teams with Nancy Meyers to capture the lived-in feel her sets are known for. From researching the cottage in the film, which just about every friend I have fell in love with, I found out it was actually a fake.

{Insert diappointed sigh here.}

Once again, we were dazzled by the deep blue eyes and fake abs of the movie set versus the real thing – but that is a compliment to those who really pay attention to the details. Apparently the whole house was a fiberglass set built in a field in Shere (or Sheire or Shire), a village on the river Tillngbourn in Surrey, England. The interior of the house was actually constructed on a sound stage in Los Angeles.

What makes this film set special are the details: Ticking runners up the stairs, chintz fabrics mixed with plush velvet, and a tasteful, eclectic, beautiful incorporation of found objects. It is believable that Kate Winslet’s character acquired those pieces over time on what a copy writer might make (had she inherited the house from a dying relative), and that she didn’t just show up on set to read her lines.

One thing I home in on when watching a film is: on learning the career of the character, can they afford the home they are in given what their income is supposed to be? For me, it is the answer to this question that illustrates the authenticity of the set. If they are a struggling bookshop owner in a West End brownstone – I am not able to suspend my disbelief.

Here, the interior of the home looks affordable for the career the character has. The actual house is probably outside of her reach…a home with land outside of London – not bloody likely – but a shabby tea kettle, red wooden beads on the fireplace, books, comfy chairs…yes, she can afford that.

RoseHill Cottage; Photo credt: Spaceball
Rosehill Cottage

Rosehill Cottage, complete with cozy, sagging roof.

It seems hoardes of women (and men) didn’t know it was a fake, and called the town’s phone number asking about the house. The film caused such a to-do in the little village, they posted information for individuals wishing to visit the area and walk in Iris’s & Amanda’s footsteps on their website. (Gotta love something that creates surprise income for someone.)

The cottage in the movie appears to be patterned after this cottage in Cotswold, 95 miles, from Surrey, for about $1000, you too can live the fantasy.

Some interior shots courtesy of a German site I can’t understand…I’m partial to the cottage over the California house…

here

Nostalgic Elegance: Aristocratic plush with faded floral patterns

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Proof positive that long bath tubs are appreciated.

Proof positive that long bath tubs are appreciated.

here
here

stair

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Christine

Should be in movies: Abandoned Miracles

Posted in Should be in movies with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 14, 2009 by Christine Haskell

Nothing moves me more than buildings which have a past, are past their prime, still have good bones, and are resting peacefully. These buildings, in particular, really made me pause.  They are stunning. Because I lack the background of an architect, I won’t even try to describe them in any professional way…but I am interested in learning more about their style.

These came from photos from Andrew Qzman…whose site is in Russian, so I couldn’t understand any background about them (where they were taken, the names of these houses, etc).

I’m so surprised of the condition the houses are in and that they have not been completely looted. Were these homes in the US and not in the protection of a historical society, they would have been home to drug users or allowed to just decay. When I travel, I always marvel at how respectful locals are toward their aging buildings.

Upward view of yellow mansion against a winter sky.

Upward view of yellow mansion against a winter sky.

Gorgeous red mansion pictured in late afternoon sun.

Gorgeous red mansion pictured in late afternoon sun.

Beautiful eating room with bright red amoire

Beautiful eating room with bright red amoire, you can almost make out the faded wallpaper.

Dining room with bright white walls and red painted trim.

Dining room with bright white walls and red painted trim; nice trim on the ceiling.

This view just seems so anticipatory to me...shallow steps lead into darkness. Love the painted trim.

This view just seems so anticipatory to me...shallow steps lead into darkness. Love the painted trim.

Beautiful room with

Beautiful panelled room; I love the multi-trims and color choices.

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Another view of that staircase going down. The trim makes the room looks like it belongs out of a Grimms Tale.

here

Blue bedroom, multi trims and painted ceiling.

here

Beautiful windows

House

Late afternoon photograph. Kind of makes you think of what it must have been like in its prime, what was being made for dinner, who was coming, were they a happy family?

Yellow Mansion

Can you imagine waking up in a place like this?? How incredible this must have been! The linens, the conversations late into the evenings.

here

This view looks a bit top heavy, but still gorgeous. Christmas here must have been spectacular.

What an incredible home to drive up to. Imagine the  bride's first arrival here.

What an incredible home to drive up to. Imagine the bride's first arrival here.

here

Imagine arriving here as a guest for the first time. The light gives this photo an inexplicable sense of anticipation (for me). I'm imagining what incredible gatherings of friends and family there could have been.

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Christine

Movie Real Estate: Where In Real Life…is this?

Posted in Movie Houses with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 5, 2009 by Christine Haskell

So…yet another film where I completely by passed the leading man (whom if he became available I would drop everything) and fell in love (again) with a house in Rhode Island. It was a green, three story home, all wood interior, lots of book cases, in/outdoor shower (for those long days playing touch football outside), and have a very warm, lived in living room and kitchen.

The house is available for rent here for a *gulp* fee of $6k per week.

Some photos:

Spare Bedroom

Spare Bedroom

Love the light in these rooms. They beg for an afternoon nap after an early morning swim. Bed clothese likely from solid New England companies: LL Bean being a favorite of these rental homes.

Living Room (note Stone Fireplace)

Living Room (note Stone Fireplace)

Love the living room here. The hearth is warm an inviting, the wicker chairs a classic “been here forever” look. I’m marveling at the space here, you can practically throw a square dance – or at least a healthy game of Twister.

Stairway, warm wood interior

Stairway, warm wood interior

Love the staircase here. Perfect for little ones pearing through and spying on the long, drawn out conversations of the adults catching up after a long year.

And...another view of those stairs

And...another view of those stairs

The warm wood in this home is really appealing. I like the look of exposed, aged beams.

Claw foot tub

Claw foot tub

I mean really, there is no woman out there who doesn’t appreciate a claw foot tub. One of my friends said to me once, “I would be in the bathtub all the time, if my legs would fit in it.” I realize we are all in a conservative phase right now in terms of consuming resources, however, a deep bathtub should really be a minimum luxury everyone should have an opportunity to enjoy. Work is hard enough for crying out loud!

It was filmed in Rhode Island in the cities of Newport, East Greenwich, West Greenwich, Jamestown, Westerly, and Providence in November and December 2006. The opening scene was filmed at Seven Stars Bakery in Providence. However, the facade of the building and the interior are altered. When Dan is pulled over by the Newport Police, he is on Ocean Ave. in Newport. In scenes filmed in Jamestown, two bridges are clearly visible: the Jamestown Bridge and its replacement, the Jamestown-Verrazzano Bridge. Demolition of the Jamestown Bridge was initiated on April 18, 2006.

In researching Dan In Real Life, I happened upon an interesting trend: tours related to the experiences of the movie. I had seen this phenom with Sex In The City where bus tours of over make up’d, 4+-inch heel-wearing women are shuttled from one vapid cocktail destination to another – the  offering seems rather cultish to me.

However, this offering seems a little more down to earth and within reach – if you are looking to emulate a sort of life style that seems unapproachable for most. Namely getting along with your family for more than 4 straight days, in a beautiful home where people gracefully rotate to cook the meals, and get up early to work out together – um, this isn’t my family per say…but I can see the romance in the idea. I think if Liz could guarantee that I would  somehow, bump into (through some sort of “pre-arranged happenstance”) the perfect guy at that bookshop AND he be THE ONE, I might be up for the idea of doing one of these tour-things. As it is, I’ll stick with real life.

Dan In Real Life

Dan In Real Life

One of the residual perks of all the moviemaking going on in Rhode Island these days is that even after the filmmakers decamp for Hollywood, you can have a hands-on experience with the places you’ve seen on screen.

So now you can bowl at the very place Steve Carell and Juliette Binoche bowled in Dan in Real Life.

You can visit the site of the bookstore where Dan and Marie, the characters they play, first met.

You can hang out at the bakery where Dan pulled his daughter away from her new boyfriend at the start of the film.

You can even stay in the secluded Jamestown house where the whole Burns clan gathered in the movie.

The eight-bedroom house, called Riven Rock, is available for rent from June through September, according to Liz Brazil, the Realtor who showed the house to the moviemakers more than once, helped make the deal with Disney and now is the exclusive agent for it.

She wouldn’t quote prices, nor even say exactly where the house, built in 1911, is located, except that it is on a secluded road and looks out over the West Passage of Narragansett Bay. One of the reasons the filmmakers liked the house, besides its rustic lived-in look, is that it was off the beaten path, away from the prying eyes of folks who might want to catch a glimpse of moviemaking in action. The filmmakers also looked at other houses — from Misquamicut to Little Compton — “but finally the mood of the house won over the director.” Complete Article

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Christine

Movie Real Estate: Gotta Have…that kitchen!

Posted in Movie Houses with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 5, 2009 by Christine Haskell

From Something’s Gotta Give….

 I watched this movie with a friend and have to say, I didn’t see the movie: I saw the house. My heart quickened, I actually felt it skip a beat, when I saw the set.

The pallette, the colors, the general aesthetic: all things I love. I missed Jack completely (not that I fell into his target demographic) – and fell for the house. Loved the bright, beachy artwork throughout, the choice in fabrics – everything. Check out that Swedish grandfather clock along the wall!

Apparently, they shipped 3,000 books from New York’s Strand Book Store to fill the home – to reflect that a writer or lover of books lived there. It’s these facts that remind me “no one really lives like this,” which is (I believe) the same as “no man or woman really has perfect abs.” Same thing. Of course, that doesn’t stop me from pining over the set design.

The Living Room

The Living Room

For Something’s Gotta Give, director Nancy Meyers asked set decorator Beth Rubino to create a substantial Hamptons house for Diane Keaton, who plays a substantial Manhattan playwright whose daughter is having an affair with Jack Nicholson—until chest pains turn his heart up-side down in more ways than one. Forced to recuperate in the guest room of his girlfriend’s mother’s beach retreat, Nicholson finds that his unexpected infirmary is as big a player as those who inhabit it.

“The house had to reflect Diane’s character, who is a very successful, accomplished New York playwright in her mid-50s,” says Meyers. She is also a divorcée, following a 20-year marriage, who built her Hamptons house as “a gift to herself—no compromises—just her total vision of a peaceful life. Naturally, it’s a different mind-set than that of a woman who has been single or is part of a couple. There was no chance, for instance,” she chuckles, “that she was going to put a double sink in the bathroom.” Nor, for that matter, include an office. “The desk in her bedroom signifies she’s romantically shut down, in a stage of life where nothing’s going to be going on in the bedroom, so why not have a desk?” Complete article: Architectual Digest

The 2003 comedy “Something’s Gotta Give” starred Oscar-winning legends Diane Keaton and Jack Nicholson. But for lots of moviegoers, the most memorable role was played by the house, especially its big, light-filled kitchen.

Another take on this theme….

The airy, shingled Hamptons beach house is walled with windows and built-in bookcases. The rooms are open, the furniture slipcovered and the walls and fabrics awash in creamy blues, whites and tans. The kitchen gleams with white glass-front cabinets, vintage hardware, a commercial-style range and dark soapstone counters. Complete Articla: Washington Post

heree

Production Design by Jon Hutman/Set Decoration by Beth Rubino

 

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Christine

Movie Real Estate: Hobbit Homes, Making it in the shire

Posted in Movie Houses with tags , , , , , , , on April 5, 2009 by Christine Haskell

With the concentration on “green,” low impact living – those hobbits are looking more and more progressive each day I view my electric bill.  Someone has even posted blue prints so you can build your own. Happy foundation stomping!

Exterior: Hobbit Home

Exterior: Hobbit Home

There is something rather cozy about those curved walls and porthole windows.

Inside the Hobbit Home

Inside the Hobbit Home

Photocredit: www.tentonhammer.com/node/12459

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Christine

Movie Real Estate: Pippi Longstockings

Posted in Movie Houses with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 5, 2009 by Christine Haskell

Another of my childhood favorites: Pippi Longstocking’s House

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This house was used in the 1988 children’s movie The Adventures of Pippi Longstockings. This house is located in the “Old Town” area of Fernandina Beach, Florida. I have to say, it’s very “Disney” – by which I mean Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang, Tom Sawyer or Pollyanna could have been filmed here. It’s rather a generic house, and very much like the homes in other Disney films of the day.

Old Town was originally settled by Timucuan Indians, who probably chose it because of its high and dry location along the Amelia River and its fertile soil. Later, the Spanish recognized these attributes as well as its defensible position in the western Atlantic, and because it was close to the gold route from South America to Spain. Old Town was platted by the Spanish in 1811 – the last town platted to the ‘Laws of the Indies’ in the Western hemisphere. Four other US cities were platted to the Laws of the Indies; they are (in alphabetical order) Albuquerque NM, Laredo TX, Santa Fe NM, and Tucson AZ *. The original grid – encompassing some 26 blocks – remains to this day, although some has been lost to erosion by the river and other by the routing of the ‘14th Street extension’ through it. Included in the original plat was the Plaza de la Constitution (Plaza San Carlos) which occupies a full block of green space overlooking the Amelia River and is now administered by nearby Fort Clinch State Park; two blocks are included in the historic Bosque Bello Cemetery. Old Town is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Her actual residence in Stockholm, Sweden is much more impressive–and I have to say, this house is the only house Pippi could have lived in. It’s very her: unique, off beat, and the very place that would capture a child’s imagination. I love the color choices, the architectural details and the horse on the front porch – only Pippi!

Villa Villekulla

Pippi lives in a small Swedish village, sharing the house she styles “Villa Villekulla” with her monkey, Mr. Nilsson, and her horse, Little Old Man, but no adults or relatives. She befriends the two children living next-door: Tommy and Annika Settergren. The three have many adventures. Mr. Settergren often disapproves of Pippi’s sometimes coarse manners and lack of education, but Mrs. Settergren feels that Pippi would never put Tommy and Annika in harm’s way, and that Pippi values her friendship with the pair above almost anything in her life. Pippi’s two main possessions are a suitcase full of gold coins (which she used to buy her horse) and a large chest of drawers containing various small treasures.

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Christine

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